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Posts Tagged ‘EBIT’

BHP Billiton’s record profits don’t hide industry concerns

August 26, 2011 Comments off

“Robust demand, industry wide cost pressures and
persistent supply side constraints continued to support the fundamentals for the majority of BHP Billiton’s core commodities. In that context, another strong year of growth in Chinese crude steel production ensured steelmaking material prices were the major contributing factor to the US$17.2 billion price related increase in Underlying EBIT.

However, BHP Billiton has regularly highlighted its belief that costs tend to lag the commodity price cycle as consumable, labour and contractor costs are broadly correlated with the mining industry’s level of activity. In the current environment, tight labour and raw material markets are presenting a challenge for all operators, and BHP Billiton is not immune from that trend. The devaluation of the US dollar and inflation reduced Underlying EBIT by a further US$3.2 billion.”

Source: BHP Billiton news release, August 24 2011

Observations:

  • BHP Billiton, which uses a fiscal year ending June 31st, reported record full year EBIT of $32bln on revenues of $72bln.
  • The 62% year on year increase in EBIT was mainly caused by ‘uncontrollable’ price increases. BHP managed to increase volumes slightly, but this gain was offset by higher costs of over $1.4bln. In a breakdown of the cost increase BHP estimates approx. half of the increase to be structural.

Implications:

  • Analysts point at the weakness of BHP’s buy-back program, in which the company runs the risk of overpaying for its own shares. In general the buyback and dividend program reveals the lack of investment options and the hesitance of management to embark on aggressive expansion in the light of global economic and financial uncertainty. Though industry leaders continue to mention supply shortage as key industry driver, they don’t want to end up at the top of the cost curve.
  • Key developments to watch in the coming months are the continuation of China’s rapid growth; high iron ore, copper & coal prices; and survival of the international financial system. If any of these trends turn around, 2011 might well be the peak of the mining industry’s profits, after which the mantra of ‘cost control’ replaces the current theme of ‘capacity growth’.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Vale reports record full year financials

February 28, 2011 Comments off

“Vale, the world’s largest iron ore miner, reported record net profit for last year as demand remained strong in China and nickel volumes recovered. The company on Thursday said it earned net profit of $17.26bn in 2010, more than three times what it made a year earlier, as sales reached $46.48bn, nearly double the $23.94bn of revenue in 2009.

Asia accounted for more than 53 per cent of operating revenue, with China contributing more than 33 per cent and Japan 11 per cent.”

Source: Financial Times, February 25 2011

Observations:

  • Revenue for 2010 is 21% higher than the previous record of 2008. EBIT, EBITDA and Net Earnings are up over 30% since 2008 as the EBITDA margin increased by 6%, mainly driven by higher iron ore prices. Earnings per Share of $3.25 are on the top side of analyst expectations.
  • The company is working on iron ore expansion projects in Carajás (Northern Brazil) and the new Simandou deposit in Guinea. Apolo (Brazil’s Southeast system) and Carajás Serra Sul are further down the line of expanding production, planned to be delivered in 2014. Ferrous minerals accounted for 92% of adjusted EBIT over 2010, showing the company’s large dependence on iron ore prices.
  • Expansion for non-ferrous commodities mainly takes place outside Brazil: Mozambique’s Moatize coal project; Zambia’s Konkola North copper project; Argentina’s Rio Colorado fertilizer project; and Peru’s Bayovar fertilizer expansion signify the increasing international presence of the company.

Implications:

  • The improved gross margin of the company does not indicate it has costs under control, but mainly that prices were higher. Vale did not suffer from exchange rate fluctuations as much as its peers as most of its costs are incurred in currencies linked to the dollar, but it mentions cost pressures in the areas of depreciation (resulting from expansion of the equipment fleet) and in procurement.
  • Cash position of $10bln at the end of 2010 and the outlook to beat last year’s cash flow from operations of $20bln in 2011 gives Agnelli a lot of flexibility in expanding. Vale will have to use the pile of cash to build a sustainable position among the supermajors even if iron ore prices come down. As the senior management indicates no major acquisitions will be done, the company will focus on organic growth (33 projects to be delivered by 2015) to achieve this objective.
  • When presenting the results no mention was made of election of a new CEO for Vale. Reelection of Roger Agnelli when his current term ends in March is not fully certain as tensions with the government are mentioned. Henrique Meirelles, Brazil’s former central bank governor, and base metals chief Tito Botelho Martins would be potential candidates to succeed him. The decision will have to be made by the powers behind Vale: the Brazilian government, Pension fund Previ and Banco Bradesco, and Mitsui.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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