Home > Market change > Rio Tinto signs agreement with Guinean government

Rio Tinto signs agreement with Guinean government

April 25, 2011

“Rio Tinto’s most troubled mining project appears poised for multibillion-dollar development after the company agreed to pay $700m to the government of Guinea and grant it a 35 per cent stake in its iron ore mine. The deal was reached on Friday ahead of plans by Guinea, a west African country rich in iron ore and bauxite, to review all mining licences as part of its push to secure bigger returns from its mineral wealth.

Vale and other multinational miners active in Guinea now have a precedent for their negotiations with the government. Vale, the Brazilian company that is the biggest iron ore miner, paid $2.5bn for a stake in a Guinean deposit last year. Rio’s deal allows Guinea to move towards a 35 per cent stake in Simandou, the iron ore deposit – located in a remote corner of the country – that is thought to be one of the world’s best untapped lodes of the ore.”

Source: Financial Times, April 23 2011

Observations:

  • Last month Guinea announced a review of mining licenses, including the demand to get minority stakes in all major mining projects in the country.
  • Rio Tinto controls blocks 3 and 4 of the Simandou deposit, with Brazil’s Vale controlling blocks 1 and 2. First shipment of iron ore by Rio Tinto is expected by mid-2015.

Implications:

  • The agreement of Rio Tinto to construct a railway through is a major blow for the government of Liberia, which hoped to convince the miners to export the ore with a shorter route via Liberia. The decision on the export route will further trigger challenging negotiations with Vale about using the same infrastructure to export ore from the area.
  • The 35% government stake can be build up over time, with the final 10% to be bought at market value in 15-20 years time. Tax rate is set at 30% after the first 8 years, with additional 3.5% royalties. The $700mln payment is only made conditional on granting the concession and approving the Rio Tinto / Chalco joint venture. Based on these conditions it appears Guinea intends to be a friendly host to international mining companies in the long term, but requires strict payment and infrastructure development contribution in the short term.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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