Home > Mining Week > Mining Week 46/’11: Hard times for emerging market multinationals

Mining Week 46/’11: Hard times for emerging market multinationals

November 13, 2011

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Vedanta reports disappointing results
    • Earnings of the industrial metals miner with many operations in India dropped despite revenue increase of 43% for the half year. Reduced earnings were caused by losses in the aluminium group and by a weak rupee (with 45% of revenue in India).
    • Sources: Vedanta results presentation; Financial Times; Wall Street Journal
  • Anglo and Codelco battle over Sur
    • Only days after Anglo agreed to pay $5.1bln for a 40% stake of De Beers, it decided to sell a stake of its Chilean Sur copper project to Mitsubishi for $5.4bln. The sale has led to disagreement with Codelco, which claims to hold an option on 49% of the total project, not just on Anglo’s share.
    • Sources: Anglo American press release; Financial Times; Wall Street Journal
  • Caterpillar chooses to produce in USA and Indonesia, buys into China

    Trends & Implications:

    • Though the results for Vedanta were not met with enthusiasm on the markets, they were in line with the strategy set out by the management in May: growth, long term value, and sustainability. Vedanta currently chooses to increase its market share instead of generating high profits, in the awareness that the current development will for a large part determine which companies will be the emerging market multinationals of the future.
    • The fight between Anglo and Codelco over the ownership stakes in the Chilean copper assets is flanked by a fight by Japanese co-investors and traders. Codelco sided with Mitsui to build its 49% stake at a low valuation, but Anglo found a way to get a higher price by selling part of the asset to rivaling keiretsu Mitsubishi.

    M&A overview update

    The M&A overview of the Business of Mining has been updated with Anglo’s 40% acquisition of De Beers.

    ©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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