Home > Mining Week > Mining Week 12/’12: Australian tax passed, but BHP warns for demand

Mining Week 12/’12: Australian tax passed, but BHP warns for demand

March 24, 2012

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Australian Minerals Resource Rent Tax finally approved
    • The tax on high profits for Australian iron ore and coal projects which led to a change of premier in the country was finally passed by the parliament last week.
    • Officials from the mineral rich states of Western Australia and Queensland argued that the taxation should be a state arrangement rather than a federal law
    • Many critics expect the MRRT not to bring in the amount of cash the governments expect because of tax management by the largest players and potentially because of lower profit margins as a result of increasing costs.
    • Sources: Economist; Wall Street Journal
  • Mixed signals on China’s iron ore demand
    • In the same week BHP warned that China’s demand for iron ore is slowing down and the Australian state of Western Australia increased its outlook for exports.
    • BHP still is bullish about long term demand in China and does not scale down its investment programs. However, in the short term the company ‘’gives caution” demand might drive down iron ore price to $120/t
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; BHP Billiton presentation; Financial Times

  • Power struggle for Rusal amidst debt issues
    • A new chairman was appointed to the board of Rusal and his predecessor, mr. Vekselberg, made public that the company was struggling with large debt problems and said it had management problems.
    • Rusal announced that it would write down a large part of the value of its Norilsk stake in an attempt to restructure its balance sheet.
    • Sources: Financial Times 1; Financial Times 2; Lex Video

Trends & Implications:

  • Various of the large Russian miners are trying to diversify both in products and geographic presence. Key problems the companies appear to encounter are a clash of management and corporate governance styles between Russia and western investors and large debt burdens in combination with the need to reinvest most or all of free cash flow to modernize or expand.
  • Australia basically kicked off a wave of mining taxation overhauls in countries around the world. Given the very large output of coal and iron ore operations in the country the implementation of the MRRT will be the most impactful for the overall profitability of the industry. As many of the new tax regimes are based on progressive operating margin scales and operating margins of most companies are decreasing because of cost inflation, it is questionable if the new regimes will result in the income countries are hoping for in the short term.

©2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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