Home > Mining Week > Mining Week 38/’12: Fortescue in debt trouble; South African shutdowns

Mining Week 38/’12: Fortescue in debt trouble; South African shutdowns

September 16, 2012

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Fortescue trading halted in prep for announcement
    • Trading in Fortescue’s shares has been halted in preparation of an announcement to be made by Tuesday Sep-18. The company earlier in the week stressed it is in compliance with all its debt covenants, but it is looking to restructure debt as low prices and aggressive expansion investment could result in short-term liquidity problems for the company.
    • Fortescue is a rapidly growing iron ore producer active in Western Australia’s Pilbara region. The company is ramping up to produce 155mn tonnes per year (from a current 60Mtpa), but it has lost 50% of its market value over the past 6 months as investors doubt it will manage to finance the investment plans without sustained high iron ore prices.
    • Sources: Fortescue announcements; Financial Times; The Australian
  • South African trouble spreads beyond Lonmin
    • Anglo Platinum shut down its Rustenburg operations this week as employees showing up for work were intimidated by striking colleagues. In the meantime Lonmin’s Marikana operations are still shut down and Xstrata and GoldFields reduced production in precautionary measures.
    • Despite talks between Lonmin and unions a deal between the striking miners and the company appears to be a long way off. The gap between Lonmin’s wage increase offer and the demands by the unions is over 100%, and the social unrest and promises made by many leaders make it hard for the unions to accept a deal that is much lower than the initial demands.
    • Sources: Financial Times 1; Wall Street Journal; Financial Times 2
  • Glencore’s new offer received positively
    • Glencore released the details of its new offer for takeover of Xstrata. The increased share ration and deal terms appear to win over a sufficient part of Xstrata’s shareholders to make the deal happen. Qatar’s sovereign wealth fund, Xstrata’s 2nd largest shareholders behind Glencore, did not yet respond to the offer.
    • According to the new terms Xstrata’s CEO Mick Davis would have to step down and leave the reign to Glencore’s Ivan Glasenberg within 6 months and the retention package for senior Xstrata managers would stay intact unless Xstrata’s board of directors wants to change it.
    • Sources: Glencore documentation; text; Financial Times

Trends & Implications:

  • Fortescue might suddenly become the focal point of the next big takeover attempt in the mining industry. Share price has decreased dramatically compared to iron ore majors, and both BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto could realize significant synergies with Fortescue’s operations and projects in Western Australia’s Pilbara region.
  • The current low iron ore price has created a situation in which Fortescue’s share price is depressed because operating cash flow does not support the planned combination of investment and debt repayment. Fortescue’s expansion is for a large part finance by debt, loading a company which is worth just over $9bn with over $8bn of debt. BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto, and Vale should all be interested in an acquisition and would be able to get a better deal at debt restructuring because they would pose a lower risk of default to lenders.
  • Caused in part by less potential for economies of scale in transportation than the key competitors, Fortescue operates at clearly higher costs (i.e. lower margins) than Rio and BHP. Quickly realizing cost synergies and aligning the project portfolio with the larger portfolio for the acquiring company would/will be the focus of successful integration.

2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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