Archive

Posts Tagged ‘capital expenditure’

PWC: Mine 2011 – The game has changed

June 13, 2011 Comments off

Accountant and consultancy PWC launched its annual review of the mining industry: Mine 2011. The report analyzes the financial performance of the 40 largest listed mining companies and describes the underlying trends in the industry:

“Last year we highlighted the growing optimism in the mining industry and demand fundamentals that were driving the industry back to boom times. The 2010 results have delivered on this expectation, but it is clear that the game has changed.

  • Combined net profits hit $100 billion
  • Operating cash flows up 59%, leaving more than $100 billion cash on hand
  • Emerging market miners outperform traditional players
  • Capital expenditure of $300 billion announced
  • Supply and cost management key challenges

Revenues for the world’s 40 largest miners leapt 32% to a record $435 billion, driven by surging commodity prices and a 5% increase in production output in 2010.The strong top-line result catapulted the miners’ net profits to an impressive $110 billion – a 156% increase over the previous year.”

Source: PWC, June 2011

Key takeaways:

  • PWC argues that the cost base for many commodities has shifted, resulting in a fundamental change in the supply structure that justifies the commodity price increase. This shift of the cost structure is partly caused by downstream players entering the mining market with a focus more on supply security than on cost effectiveness.
  • The report further shows that the capital expenditure in the industry is still very much lagging the increase in profits, further creating a situation of supply shortage: “In 2010 for every dollar earned in revenue only 18 cents were invested, significantly lower than the 40 cents invested per dollar of revenue in 2007 and the 2003-2009 average of 26 cents per dollar. In 2010 Investing cash flows were only 58% of operating cash flows, compared to an average of 94% for 2003-2009.”
  • New players in the global top 40 are: Agnico-Eagle Mines, Coal India, Industrias Penoles, KGHM Polska Miedz, Shandong Gold Mining, and Silver Wheaton.

More consultant’s reports? See the Business of Mining special ‘Free consulting: Mining industry reports’

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Advertisements

Anglo American eyes $70bln Growth Pipeline

April 27, 2011 Comments off

“Anglo American PLC currently has in the pipeline about $70 billion worth of projects that it plans to use to drive organic growth in the years ahead, senior company executives said Thursday. Cynthia Carroll, the mining company’s chief executive, said at the company’s annual general meeting here that the growth ahead is strong with ‘a new mining operation [starting] every six to nine months for the next several years.’

The company plans to increase volume output 35% by 2013 and increase 50% by 2015. It is looking to double output by 2020 based on a growth pipeline of about $70 billion of approved and unapproved projects, senior company executives said during the meeting. The company is currently developing $17 billion in projects and is looking to approve another $16 billion in the near term. A remaining $50 billion worth of projects are still waiting to be approved.”

Source: Wall Street Journal, April 21 2011

Observations:

  • Anglo American currently has 4 major growth projects nearing production: the los Bronces copper expansion project in Chile; the Barro Alto nickel project in Brazil; the Minas-Rio iron ore project in Brazil; and Kolomela iron ore project in South Africa. Furthermore the company is investing heavily in Jwaneng diamond mine in Botswana. These five projects account for $13.5bln of the approved CapEx.
  • Other approved projects are mainly in platinum, with 7 projects in Southern Africa summing up to over $3bln investment. Key unapproved projects are Quellaveco and Michiquillay copper projects in Peru; Sishen iron ore expansion in South Africa; and South African New Largo and Colombian Cerrejon thermal coal projects

Implications:

  • Anglo American currently leans heavily on its copper business (29% of profits in 2010) and iron ore business (38% of profits in 2010), mainly due to high prices. Expansion plans will mainly increase the exposure to platinum, nickel and coal, ensuring strong diversification of the company’s revenue sources.
  • Anglo American’s approved CapEx of $18bln compares to Rio Tinto’s $22bln and Xstrata’s $14bln (at time of publishing 2010 annual report). Only BHP Billiton plans to invest much more in organic growth in the coming years. However, boosted by high cash reserves growth by acquisitions would again be an option for Anglo American. With the frontier of development projects shifting to Africa, the company clearly has a favorable position to make good deals with its experience in operating projects in the continent.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Rio Tinto plans Russian diamond push

March 22, 2011 Comments off

“Rio Tinto is planning a push into Russian diamond mining, eyeing a tie-up with Alrosa, the state-owned miner, as the global industry looks ahead to rising demand from China amid tight supply constraints. Rio is understood to be a final contender to form a partnership with Alrosa to develop a large deposit near the northern port of Archangel, according to diamond market insiders.

The company declined to comment on its intentions or on wider reports that Tom Albanese, chief executive, had travelled repeatedly over the past year to Russia, a country where Rio has no operations. Rio makes the bulk of its profits from iron ore but it is also a significant diamond miner, producing 13.8m carats last year, compared with De Beers’ 33m and Alrosa’s 34.3m. Alrosa exceeded De Beers’ production for a second year.”

Source: Financial Times, March 20 2011

Observations:

  • Rio Tinto mined 13.8m carats last year in its Diavik and Argyle mines, the lowest volume in over 5 years. Relative importance of diamonds in Rio Tinto’s portfolio has decreased from over 20% of EBITDA 10 years ago to only some 2% now.
  • Argyle and Diavik have approximately similar proved reserves, but probable reserves for Argyle are much higher than for Diavik. Additionally the company has some low grade probable reserves in Murowa (Zimbabwe) and an ongoing feasibility study in India (Bunder). Total recoverable reserves at end of 2010 stands at 206mln carats. In the last annual report the company listed the search for opportunities for inorganic growth in Diamonds and Minerals as key priority.

Implications:

  • Alrosa is facing high levels of investment to increase production in challenging arctic underground mining conditions. Because of low cash flow from operations it has to look to financial markets (IPO) and partnerships to secure funds for capital expenditure.
  • Teaming up with Rio Tinto gives Alrosa not only access to development capital, but also to the extensive knowledge Rio Tinto has gained by operating Diavik’s mine in Northern Canada. However, Rio Tinto will not step into a partnership with a state-controlled Russian company without getting strong commitments to secure its returns.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com