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Posts Tagged ‘Carroll’

Mining Week 46/’12: Lonmin vs. Xstrata & the CEO-carousel

November 10, 2012 Comments off

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Lonmin raises equity to stay independent
    • Lonmin announced a $800m rights offering, in that way fending of the proposal by Xstrata to increase its stake in the troubled platinum miner to a majority share.
    • The strikes in South Africa, which escalated at Lonmin’s operations, have caused significant lost production and urgent financial issues for Lonmin.
    • Sources: Lonmin press release; Financial Times; Wall Street Journal
  • BHP starts search for new CEO
    • BHP Billiton has started the search for the successor of CEO Marius Kloppers. Apparently the company will not necessarily promote an insider to the top position.
    • With Mick Davis leaving Xstrata if/when the merger with Glencore is approved and Cynthia Carroll leaving AngloAmerican next year, 3 of the top CEOs in the mining industry will change.
    • Sources: Financial Times 1; The Economist; Financial Times 2
  • India limits export of iron ore
    • Iron ore exports from the Indian state of Orissa will be limited strongly by new production quota for mines without processing facilities.
    • The government is trying to attract processing investment to prevent iron ore is only exported without significant benefit for the country. High export duties (raised to 30% early this year) and production quota are used to discourage exports from the world’s 3rd largest iron ore exporter.
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; Commodity Online; Steel Orbis

Trends & Implications:

  • Orissa’s attempts to curb exports don’t do much to stimulate local investment in processing capacity. India’s government announced a year ago that it would make it more attractive for companies to invest by setting up mining right and process plant permitting packages. With the current uncertainty about both global demand and India’s local demand outlook it is unlikely that large investments in additional processing capacity will be made in Orissa in the near future. As a result the will mainly slow down the local economy.
  • Almost a year ago, after the announcement of Ferreira as new CEO of Vale, this blog conducted a poll among its readers to find out which top company CEO was mostly to be replaced first. The results showed most trust in the future of Kloppers at BHP. A year later 3 out of 4 are on their way out, while most CFOs have been replaced over the past 2 years too. The high level of activity in replacing top executives indicates a change of mindset in the boards of these companies: shifting from a focus on growth and investment to a focus on operational excellence and payout. The new group of top executives will mainly need to show a track record of cost-control and willingness to make tough decisions on closure of mines.

Results of Dec-2011 Poll on thebusinessofmining.com

2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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Mining Week 49/’11: Changes at the top

December 4, 2011 Comments off

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Vanselow quits as BHP CFO
    • After 5 years as CFO of the world’s largest miner Alex Vanselow (Brazilian national) announced he will step down and look for a CEO position in the industry. Mr. Vanselow managed to get BHP through the economic downturn in great financial shape (helped by high commodity prices). His recent experience in acquisitions of Chesapeake assets and Petrohawk and the failed acquisitions of Rio Tinto, Potashcorp, and the failed Pilbara JV with Rio Tinto, make him an interesting candidate for any resources company looking to grow by M&A.
    • Sources: BHP Billiton Press Release; Financial Times; Wall Street Journal
  • Codelco and Anglo continue their copper fight
    • In a legal fight over the rights to the Anglo American Sur project Anglo’s lawyers blame Codelco and the Chilean government to act unfairly. Codelco holds an option to buy 49% of the project, but it is unclear whether that is only of Anglo’s stake or of the total project.
    • Sources: Financial Times; Anglo American Press Release; Codelco Press Releases
  • BHP Billiton gets out of diamonds
    • BHP Billiton announced it will review its options around its only diamond project: Ekati diamond mine in arctic Canada. Rio Tinto, which owns the nearby Diavik diamond mine, is the most likely buyer because of the synergistic potential and the lack of funds and abundance of capital spending needs of other large diamond miners.
    • Sources: BHP Billiton Press Release; Financial Times; MiningMx

Trends & Implications:

  • Mr. Vanselow will be an interesting candidate for global companies looking for a change of CEO. As Brazil’s Vale recently changed CEO and Petrobras’ Gabrielli de Azevedo is widely recognized as a strong CEO with work to do he will most likely look to head up a foreign player. The ideal period for a CEO is typically seen as 6-8 years: after that a new point of view and a new alignment with the personality needed for the phase of a company is often helpful. Taking a look at the top positions of the world’s largest miners at this moment, several CEO position changes can be expected over the coming years.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Newcrest Earnings Surge as CEO Steps Down

February 11, 2011 Comments off

“Newcrest Mining Ltd. Chief Executive Ian Smith unexpectedly resigned from the world’s fifth-largest gold miner Friday, as the company said fiscal first-half net profit more than doubled to 437.8 million Australian dollars ($439.4 million) from a year earlier.

Mr. Smith, who took over as head of the company in July 2006, said he was leaving to ‘pursue other areas of personal interest’ and would be handing over to Greg Robinson, the company’s executive director of finance. His resignation surprised many in the market, who had expected to see Mr. Smith enjoy the fruits of his labors after turning the company around and completing the acquisition of smaller rival Lihir Gold Ltd. in September.”

Source: Wall Street Journal, February 10 2011

Observations:

  • Newcrest bought and quickly integrated Lihir last summer in an $8bln deal, almost doubling the production capacity of the company.
  • In the wake of the financial crisis and with the increase of the gold price over the past decade directors of gold miners seem to see a lot of worth in finding CEOs with a solid financial background. Barrick’s Aaron Regent, Newmont’s Richard O’Brien, GoldField’s Nicholas Holland, and Newcrest’s Greg Robinson all held CFO positions prior to being appointed CEO.

Implications:

  • Mr. Smith is mentioned to potentially take a top position at either BHP Billiton or Rio Tinto. However, he denies having any concrete plans for a future executive job at this moment. CEO positions at both Anglo American and Vale might become available in the near future: Anglo’s Cynthia Carroll has completed a successful turnaround of the company, while Vale’s Agnelli sees the term in which he turned the domestic champion into the world’s second largest miner end this May. Vale’s board is likely to either give Agnelli a new term or to appoint another Brazilian CEO to ensure good political ties with the government.
  • Expansion of the current group of diversified miners into gold mining should not be ruled out. As they currently hold minor positions in the precious metals market, this might be one of the fields where large deals are still approved by regulators. However, with current gold prices any deal would be based on very high valuation and closed at a high price.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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