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Posts Tagged ‘Chalco’

Mining Week 15/’12: Coal in Mongolia, no coal in Australia.

April 9, 2012 Comments off

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Chalco bids for Mongolian coal miner
    • Chalco (holding company = Chinalco) made a tentative $930mln offer for 57.4% ownership of SouthGobi Resources, a Canadian listed company, currently owned by Ivanhoe resources.
    • Sources: Financial Times; Wall Street Journal
  • Coal production issues in Australia
    • BMA, the coal JV between Mitsubishi and BHP Billiton in Queensland, declared force majeure after a week long strike in some of its mines. The labor conflict has been going on for almost a year, with workers campaigning for better contract rights for contracted workers and to retain the union’s power in recruiting decisions.
    • Sources: Financial Times
  • Alcoa again cuts production
    • Alcoa, the largest aluminium producer in North America, announced it would cut alumina production by 2% to support prices.
    • At the start of the year Alcoa cut aluminum production, at that time by 12% and mainly in the USA. The 2% alumina cut is said to be aligned with this 12% ‘final product’ cut.
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; Financial Times; Alcoa press release

Trends & Implications:

  • The potential Chalco – SouthGobi deal appears to be engineered by or via Rio Tinto. Chinalco owns a significant stake of Rio Tinto, which became the majority shareholder of Ivanhoe recently with the key objective of quickly developing the Oyu Tolgoi gold-copper mine (also in Mongolia).
  • Despite a general demand boom which has not passed aluminum many major aluminum producers are posting losses. Profit margins over the past 10 years average below 10%. The key reason for this situation is an overcapacity resulting in oversupply and high inventory levels. Aluminium is currently one of the very few mined natural resources that could be seen as a ‘demand-driven’ market rather than a ‘supply-driven’ market for price setting. However, as more and more producers cut investment, the demand growth fundamentals should invert this situation in the next couple of years.

Alcoa's long term demand outlook as presented end of 2011

©2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Rio Tinto signs agreement with Guinean government

April 25, 2011 Comments off

“Rio Tinto’s most troubled mining project appears poised for multibillion-dollar development after the company agreed to pay $700m to the government of Guinea and grant it a 35 per cent stake in its iron ore mine. The deal was reached on Friday ahead of plans by Guinea, a west African country rich in iron ore and bauxite, to review all mining licences as part of its push to secure bigger returns from its mineral wealth.

Vale and other multinational miners active in Guinea now have a precedent for their negotiations with the government. Vale, the Brazilian company that is the biggest iron ore miner, paid $2.5bn for a stake in a Guinean deposit last year. Rio’s deal allows Guinea to move towards a 35 per cent stake in Simandou, the iron ore deposit – located in a remote corner of the country – that is thought to be one of the world’s best untapped lodes of the ore.”

Source: Financial Times, April 23 2011

Observations:

  • Last month Guinea announced a review of mining licenses, including the demand to get minority stakes in all major mining projects in the country.
  • Rio Tinto controls blocks 3 and 4 of the Simandou deposit, with Brazil’s Vale controlling blocks 1 and 2. First shipment of iron ore by Rio Tinto is expected by mid-2015.

Implications:

  • The agreement of Rio Tinto to construct a railway through is a major blow for the government of Liberia, which hoped to convince the miners to export the ore with a shorter route via Liberia. The decision on the export route will further trigger challenging negotiations with Vale about using the same infrastructure to export ore from the area.
  • The 35% government stake can be build up over time, with the final 10% to be bought at market value in 15-20 years time. Tax rate is set at 30% after the first 8 years, with additional 3.5% royalties. The $700mln payment is only made conditional on granting the concession and approving the Rio Tinto / Chalco joint venture. Based on these conditions it appears Guinea intends to be a friendly host to international mining companies in the long term, but requires strict payment and infrastructure development contribution in the short term.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Chinalco not planning to sell Rio Tinto stake

April 5, 2011 Comments off

“Chinalco, the Chinese aluminium group, has no plans to sell down its shares in Rio Tinto, viewing the mining house as a key strategic partner as Chinalco expands overseas. ‘We can’t go out to fight alone,’ said Chinalco chairman Xiong Weiping, explaining that co-operation with global miners was essential for overseas development. ‘With Rio being one of the top mining companies in the world, Chinalco can learn a lot from them, including in operational management, asset operation and risk management.’

Chinalco is seeking to move into mining to take advantage of the commodities bull run that has been created by China’s huge demand for raw materials such as iron ore, copper and coal. Mr Xiong outlined their plans to expand from their core aluminium business, which has struggled to make profits, into a global mining house. He said he was hunting for high-grade copper, bauxite, iron ore and coal resources, the minerals that China needs to fuel its urbanisation. ‘Our target areas are mainly countries next to China, for example south-east Asia, Mongolia and central Asia,’ said Mr Xiong.”

Source: Financial Times, April 3 2011

Observations:

  • Aluminum Corporation Of China Limited, Chinalco, and Chalco are often used interchangeably, as they are basically the same company. Chinalco is the state-owned holding company of Chalco, which is listed on various exchanges with a small part of ownership.
  • Chinalco signals its interest in partaking in the Oyu Tolgoi copper project in Mongolia, which is operated by Rio Tinto. Until now Rio Tinto has held away potential contributors to the project.

Implications:

  • With China’s mining sector growing in international importance it would be no more than logical if some of the largest diversified miners in the world in 10 years time are from China. In the domestic struggle to be this player state support will be crucial. Chinalco is positioning itself to be the Chinese diversified miner and desperately needs strong international connections to support this claim.
  • In the short and mid term the strategic stake of the company in Rio Tinto certainly is a symbiotic relationship, as demonstrated by investments in Africa and exploration partnership in China. However, if Chinalco grows into an international diversified miner as it is planning, in the long term the companies will become fierce competitors. At this point the stake in the Australian company will certainly cause conflicts.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Chalco drops $2.4bn Australian bauxite plan

July 2, 2010 Comments off

“Chalco, the second-largest aluminium producer, has pulled out of a A$3bn (US$2.4bn) deal to develop a bauxite refinery in Australia, blaming a drop in aluminium prices and difficult global conditions.

The Hong Kong-listed subsidiary of Aluminium Corporation of China won a permit to mine the high-quality Aurukun bauxite deposits in northern Queensland on condition it build a processing plant.”

Source: Financial Times, July 2 2010

Observations:

  • When Chalco, a Chinalco daughter, won the permit for the bauxite deposit aluminium prices were $3,000 a tonne compared with below $2,000 today.
  • Condition for the development was the construction of a smelter in Australia, to prevent the ore from being shipped directly to China. In this case the benefit for the Australian citizens would be significantly lower than with domestic smelting.

Implications:

  • The Australian government is likely to reopen the permitting process for the deposit, giving other firms a renewed option to develop the deposit. However, only few firms currently have the funds to undertake the project.
  • Today’s announcement by the new Australian prime minister that the super profit tax will only cover coal and iron ore operations does increase the feasibility of the project.

©2010 – thebusinessofmining.com