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Posts Tagged ‘cyclone’

Mining Week 8/’13: BHP names new CEO

February 24, 2013 Comments off

Top Stories:

  • Oil man Andrew Mackenzie named BHP Billiton CEO
    • BHP Billiton announced this week that CEO Marius Kloppers will step down in May and will be succeeded by Andrew Mackenzie, the current head of the company’s non-ferrous division, who worked for BP for 22 years and who worked for Rio Tinto prior to joining BHP Billiton.
    • Sources: BHP Billiton press release; ABC interview; Youtube Reutersvideo
  • Iron ore prices at 16-month high
    • Benchmark iron ore prices rose to a 16-month high at approx. $160/t this week. A cyclone is nearing the Australian coast, potentially causing supply disruptions in the coming week.
    • Sources: CNBC; Indian Express

Trends & Implications:

  • BHPB’s appointment of a chief executive with extensive experience in the oil and gas business signals a further shift of focus from mining to natural resource extraction in general. Given the importance of cost control in the coming years, and considering the company’s asset base in oil and gas and the limited understanding of the oil and gas industry by most miners, appointing an insider with good knowledge of the full range of assets is a logical choice.
  • The increase of iron ore prices is expected to be a relatively short-term development driven by weather expectations and the annual cyclical demand of Chinese importers. which peaks in Q4 and Q1. Long-term price expectations are still much below the current level as additional production capacity is being added at a high pace.

2013 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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Mining Week 02/’12: Temporary & Permanent Cost Increases

January 14, 2012 Comments off

Top Stories of the Week:

  • ENRC settles Congo dispute with First Quantum
    • ENRC agreed to pay $1.25bln to First Quantum to settle the dispute over the Kolwezi Tailings project, the Frontier and Lonshi mines and related exploration interests in DRC. First Quantum was stripped of the rights to these projects by the government, after which ENRC came in and agreed to buy the rights from the government in a move widely criticized in the industry.
    • Sources: ENRC press release; Financial Times; First Quantum press release
  • Coal India agrees to salary costs hike of 25%
    • Coal India, by far the largest miner of energy coal in the country, has agree to a 25% permanent increase of wages. In august of last year the unions demanded a 100% increase to offset increased cost of living and reduce the increasing income gap between management and workers. Investment bankers at the time expected the company to agree to a 15-20% increase. The salary hike results in an increase of operating cost for the company by approx. 10%.
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; Economic Times
  • Weather in Australia and Brazil drives iron ore price up

    • The closure of the export facilities in Port Hedland because of cyclone Heidi and the cancellation of shipments from Brazil because of heavy rains results in supply pressure in the iron ore market. Heavy rains are expected to continue in the Pilbara region, which supplies close to 40% of seaborne iron ore in the world, in the short term.
    • Sources: Financial Times; Supply Chain Review; Wall Street Journal; Vale Press Release

Trends & Implications:

  • Extreme weather conditions have a big influence on bulk material supply chains in the short term, because stockpiling these materials in amounts large enough to last for several weeks is very costly and thus not a normal practice. Especially the steel industry is hit hard with both iron ore and metallurgical coal having to be shipped in from locations that are often hit by storms. Although the impact on spot prices in the short term can be large, the longer term impact on the miners is quite small. Most contracts allow for some flexibility in when exactly the ore is delivered. As long as the mining operations don’t have to stop, the ore will get to the steel manufacturers as some point.
  • The wage increase expected for Coal India is a good example of the very high cost inflation of mining in developing countries. Whereas the cost increase of contracted services and equipment leasing can be seen as (at least partly) a temporary phenomenon caused by high commodity prices, the cost increase because of increased labor and consumable costs in developing countries causes a more permanent shift of the global cost curves.

©2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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