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Glencore to reshape board as IPO looms

January 26, 2011 Comments off

“Glencore plans a board shake-up as the world’s largest trading house heads towards a $50bn-$60bn public listing in London in the second quarter of the year. The Swiss-based trading house is talking to many current and former executives in the natural resources world about potential roles as senior non-executive directors for its new board, according to people familiar with the discussions.

Ivan Glasenberg, the South African chief executive of Glencore, recently held talks with Tony Hayward, the former BP chief, about a role as non-executive director in the trading house. Glencore has also held talks with Chip Goodyear, the former chief executive of BHP Billiton, the world’s largest miner by market capitalisation.

Bankers expect Glencore will disclose its plans for a $50bn-$60bn IPO in mid-March, when the trading house reports its annual results. But the trader is keeping its options open and it could still seek a merger with Xstrata, the miner in which it owns a dominant 34 per cent stake.”

Source: Financial Times, January 23 2011

Observations:

  • Glencore is one of the world’s largest private companies. However, it is experiencing growth problems as it can’t raise money to grow by issuing more equity. Furthermore the company needs to prepare for enormous payouts to top executives leaving the firm, which could cause liquidity problems. Going public would solve these problems.
  • The trading house, owning large stakes of various mining companies, showed strong profit growth for Q3 of last year, mainly driven by booming agricultural commodity prices.

Implications:

  • Most likely Glencore will have to perform an IPO before it can merge with Xstrata, as this is the easiest way to figure out the value of the company. Estimates of valuation of the company are based on a bond it issued at the end of 2009 and on industry multiples (PER of 14-18).
  • Various insiders question the probability of success of a merger with Xstrata, as the corporate cultures of the extremely results-driven trading house and the more relaxed mining house could clash. A merger between the two companies would produce the first fully vertically integrated natural resources major, which could open the door to new ways of negotiating with clients and new types of contracts.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Top 10 Priorities of Vale’s CEO Roger Agnelli

September 2, 2010 2 comments

Roger Agnelli

What are the things the CEO of the world’s second largest mining company is worried about? What is Vale’s CEO Roger Agnelli doing to catch up with BHP Billiton? What is on top of his “To Do”-list?

An analysis of Vale’s latest annual and financial reports, investor presentations and the news about the company in the last months yields a list of 10 issues that are likely to be at the top of Agnelli’ list of priorities.

The list holds strategic, operational, financial and relational activities, each of which are scored in terms of importance and urgency. Priority 1 on the list is trying to prevent BHP’s acquisition of PotashCorp. Priority 10 is managing breakthrough innovation of copper processing in Carajás. Read on for the full list of priorities.

1. Assess opportunities to prevent BHP Billiton’s PotashCorp acquisition

BHP Billiton has made a hostile $39bln acquisition offer for PotashCorp, thus following Vale’s move of entering the potash business as a diversified miner. However, the potential changes to the market and to potash pricing (currently controlled by regional cartels) are likely to make Vale’s potash assets uncompetitive. Although the company has denied being in talks with PotashCorp to find alternatives, Agnelli will certainly devote a large portion of his time to finding a response to BHP’s offer.

2. Manage integration programs to reduce costs

Vale has grown rapidly partly because of a large number of acquisitions. Insiders comment that many of the acquired companies have never been integrated completely, creating operational inefficiencies and a lack of corporate culture. To sustain growth, Agnelli will be working hard on realizing the synergies from acquisitions by building global businesses. Part of this assignment is the carve-out of the aluminium business, which has been sold to Norsk Hydro this year.

3. Anticipate on Brazilian election results

Brazil will elect a new president, senate and governors on October 3rd 2010. Both economic policy and environmental policy on federal and state level could be impacted significantly by election results. Agnelli is certainly developing scenarios to react on post-election regulatory changes.

4. Study increase of gearing in order to accelerate growth

The company has traditionally grown by M&A, but is currently guarding its gearing carefully. However, in order to enable further acquisitions, Agnelli will be discussing increasing the gearing and accessing debt with the new CFO Cavalcanti, who took over from Fabio Barbosa at the end of June, and banking partners.

5. Compete for position in China

Compared to BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto, transportation distance poses a disadvantage to Vale in supplying iron ore to China. While Rio Tinto is creating strong ties with Chinese government via its partnerships with Chinalco, Vale will need to find alternative ways to improve relationships with clients and government in the country that is responsible for most of the growth in demand of its products.

6. Manage development of Guinean iron ore deposits

An important part of the growth of the iron ore production in the next decade should be coming from Guinea, where Vale will develop the Simandou South deposit. Vale will need to get infrastructure in place and start development soon in order to please the government, which recently took development rights away from Rio Tinto because the company was not proceeding fast enough.

7. Reduce iron dependence

Growing the copper business unit and building a fertilizer business are two of the ways in which Vale tries to reduce its dependence on iron ore. Although the iron ore business is a star business with solid growth perspectives, the volatility caused by the dependence on one single commodity will worry Agnelli. Diversification into other business units is crucial for the long-term stability of the company.

8. Gain access to coal in Latin America

Although a lot of iron ore is shipped to China, Brazil is booming too. In order to produce steel for the domestic market, Vale needs to develop coal capacity in Latin America, which will require strategic acquisitions and targeted exploration.

9. Manage employee relations after Vale Inco strike

The board will need to prevent repetition of strikes like they experienced at Vale Inco during the last two years in Canada. Reviewing and improving international employee relations is both crucial for the company’s productivity and to improve the image in labor market, where Vale still has difficulties to attract international management talent.

10. Manage technological processing innovation for copper in Carajás

The company is trying to scale hydrometallurgical copper processing technology to commercial level in the Carajás UHC plant. Success in this project would have significant profit impact and would position Vale with the current deposits in development as one of the most competitive copper producers globally.

Sources: Vale annual report 2009, Vale summary review 2009, Vale investor presentation February 2010