Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Kazakhmys’

Mining Week 09/’12: Focus back to operational challenges

March 4, 2012 1 comment

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Rio Tinto invests over $0.5bln on driverless trains
    • Rio Tinto announced a large investment in its ‘Mine of the Future’ program to make the first of its approx. 150 trains on the Pilbara iron ore network driverless by 2014. The program will cost the company over $500mln, though it remains unclear what part of that amount is ‘research’ and what part is plain ‘hardware’.
    • Sources: Rio Tinto press release; Financial Times; Sydney Morning Herald on union reaction
  • Kazakhmys sees costs rise faster than revenues
    • Kazakhmys, the Kazakh copper miner, posted flat profits as growth was offset by cost increase of over 20%, mainly due to skyrocketing labour costs in the country’s resource market. The company also made bullish statements about growth of the copper demand in China.
    • Sources: Company overview; Financial Times; Reuters

Trends & Implications:

  • Driverless trains are only one step in the larger automation effort for which Rio Tinto is the technology leader. Other areas of research are improving exploration performance and increasing recovery, especially from underground mines. A lot of the automation work focuses on the iron ore operations in Northern Australia. These operations have the scale to enable large savings by automation, and they struggle continuously with finding sufficient skilled employees at acceptable costs.
  • Whether or not Rio Tinto’s role as the ‘technology leader‘ is a smart strategy is debatable: one might argue that begin a ‘smart follower‘, and thus not paying for the disappointments any large-scale research program holds, is more cost-effective. However, Rio Tinto has taken the approach that any research that can pay for itself in the long term is worth doing. Clearly the company will try to protect its findings as much as possible, but other companies will certainly start using its innovations in some way, reducing demand for skilled labor in remote positions and improving recovery potential.

©2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Advertisements

Little change for ENRC board

October 3, 2011 Comments off

“An internal review at Eurasian Natural Resources Corp, launched after of a corporate governance debacle that saw two directors ousted at the mining company’s annual meeting, has left the management and board almost unchanged. Johannes Sittard, chairman and former chief executive, remains chairman. Felix Vulis, who resigned in February citing commitments in his family life, has been restored as permanent chief executive.

The three-month review of corporate governance at the embattled FTSE 100 company, which has lost almost half its stock market valuation in 2011, includes the board appointment of Terence Wilkinson, a former chief executive of Aim-quoted Ridge Mining and Lonrho. The review, which concluded on Wednesday night, focused on whether the board of ENRC, a company that is largely controlled by three central Asian entrepreneurs with no board seats, should remain fully independent of the three men or become a more actively family-controlled miner akin to Vedanta, Fresnillo, and Antofagasta.”

Source: Financial Times, September 29 2011

Observations:

  • One of ENRC’s founders, mr. Alexander Mashkevich, was rumoured to be interested to take over the presidency of the company. However, within days of the publication of this story the results of the review were announced.
  • The review restored a majority of independent board members for the company, which was lost after various board members left or were not reelected earlier this year in a power struggle in the board.

Implications:

  • In the current situation about 70% of the shareholders are not represented in the board. This might lead to disagreement between board and shareholders in the case of a potential takeover bid. In June Glencore was said to be interested in buying ENRC, which has lost a lot of market value in the past year.
  • The Kazakh government and Kazakhmys together hold close to 40% of the shares. Both parties will not be in favor of the 3 founders (the Troika) gaining more control over the company and will be happy mr. Mashkevich does not join the board.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

ENRC tensions grow as two directors dismissed

June 9, 2011 Comments off

“Private feuding within Eurasian Natural Resources Corporation, the Kazakh miner, spilled out into the open on Wednesday as investors in the tightly held company overwhelmingly voted against the re-election of Sir Richard Sykes, the senior independent director, and fellow board member Ken Olisa.

The public dismissal of the two directors highlights the deepening tensions within the FTSE 100 miner. It has been dogged by corporate governance concerns since it floated in 2007. Speculation about boardroom battles has intensified since the group announced controversial acquisitions in central Africa last year, most notably the purchase of mining assets in the Democratic Republic of Congo that the Congo government had recently expropriated from a Canadian mining company.

In particular it will focus attention on the position of foreign companies that list in London and rely on City grandees to give comfort to shareholders. The presence of boardroom heavy-hitters was especially valuable to ENRC during last year’s controversy over acquisitions in Africa, most notably the purchase of mining assets in the Democratic Republic of Congo that the government had recently expropriated from a Canadian mining company.”

Source: Financial Times, June 8 2011

Observations:

  • ENRC was formed in 2006 by consolidation of assets privatized in the mid ’90s. The founders are Alexander Mashkevitch, Alijan Ibragimov, and Patokh Chodiev; each still holding 14.6% of the shares, with the Kazakh government holding 11.7% and Kazakhmys 26%. Because Kazakmys abstained from voting the founders and government held at least 75% of the voting shares.
  • Current CEO Felix Vulis announced his departure in February, and the founders are rumored to want to replace several other executives and board members. The dismissal of the directors has tipped the weight of the board to the founder’s side, giving them significant power.

Implications:

  • Unless the dismissal of the independent directors came as a surprise to the persons in question the fact that they did not make a quiet move out of the board should be understood as a means to draw the attention to the governance issues of the miner. It appears that the founders and the Kazakh government want to strengthen their control over the company, even though it has mainly been expanding internationally in the past years.
  • The debates in the board about the acquisition of the projects in Congo including the Kolwezi asset, formerly owned by First Quantum, indicates a cultural difference between the Kazakh hardliners and the more western independent directors with more eye for corporate social responsibility. With various other Eastern companies listing on western stock markets this will be an issue that will surface more often in the future as many development projects are undertaken in politically unstable areas.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

The Most Influential People in Mining 2010

December 30, 2010 4 comments

2010 has been an exciting year for the mining industry. The Australian Super Profits Tax debate came to a climax; the iron ore pricing mechanisms was changed to a system related to the spot market after 40 years of benchmark pricing; the Western Australian Iron Ore Joint Venture between Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton was cancelled; BHP attempted to acquire PotashCorp; 33 Chilean miners were at the center point of global media attention when they were rescued after 68 days underground. Who have been the world’s most influential people in the mining industry this year?

The Business of Mining.com gives a top 25. Based on a combination of metrics on ‘Opinion Impact’ (both public opinion and boardroom opinion) and ‘Decision Impact’ (both for 2010 and for the future). The list features a combination of industry leaders, politicians, journalists, advisors and regulators. 24 men; 1 woman. 5 Australians; 4 South Africans; 3 Chinese, 3 Americans; 2 Indians; 2 Canadians; 2 Brits; 1 Guinean; 1 Kazakh; 1 Mongolian; 1 Brazilian. The figure below gives an overview of the 25 most influential people in mining in 2010.

(Blue dots: industry leaders; green dots: journalists; orange dots: advisors; red dots: politicians; black dots: regulators)

1. Marius Kloppers – CEO BHP Billiton

Heads the world’s largest mining company. Tried to add potash to the portfolio of the company by (unsuccessfully) offering $39bln for PotashCorp of Saskatchewan. Earlier in the year not only played an active role in the debate about the Australian super profits tax, but also in the attempt to form a Joint Venture for iron ore export from Western Australia. Is furthermore seen as one of the key drivers behind the change of the iron ore pricing scheme.

2. Tom Albanese – CEO Rio Tinto

Heads the world’s third largest mining company. Worked with Kloppers on the Pilbara iron ore JV, the new pricing mechanism for iron ore, and the lobbying against the super profits tax as proposed by Kevin Rudd. Used 2010 to restructure the capital structure of his company and to strengthen the ties with Chinese industry and government via various deals with Chinalco.

3. Roger Agnelli – CEO Vale

Heads the world’s second largest mining company and largest iron ore producer. Less well-known in the west than Kloppers and Albanese, but certainly a powerful leader in the mining industry. Secured development opportunities in Guinea and in potash production expansions while carefully building relationships with the Brazilian government and the new president: Dilma Rousseff.

4. Tony Clement – Industry Minister Canada

The man that killed BHP Billiton’s hopes of acquiring PotashCorp by imposing unacceptable conditions in order to secure the deal’s ‘benefit for Canada’.

5. Cynthia Carroll – CEO Anglo American

The only women in the list, heading the fourth largest diversified miner in the world. Led the company back to profits after a dramatic 2009. Was appointed chairman of related Anglo Platinum this year and holds directorships of De Beers and BP. Furthermore plays a role in the debates about the future of the industry at the World Economic Forum.

6. Graeme Samuel – Chairman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission

Head of the regulating body that was the key obstacle for the Joint Venture between BHP Billiton and Anglo American to export iron ore from Western Australia as the JV would have given the two companies a position that would threaten global competition.

7. Michael (Mick) Davis – CEO Xstrata

Heads the world’s fifth largest diversified mining company, build rapidly by acquisitions under the helm of Davis. Proposed a merger with Anglo American in 2009, and continues to look for expansion options. Plays an important role in the debate around a potential merger of Xstrata with trading house Glencore, the company’s largest stakeholder.

8. Kevin Rudd – Former Prime Minister Australia

The brain behind the Australian super profits tax, designed to skim the ‘excessive profits’ of mining firms. The public debate around the tax was one of the reasons Rudd was not re-elected. Although not in the office anymore, the idea of the super profits tax was implemented by the new government in an adjusted form.

9. Julia Gillard – Prime Minister Australia

Benefited from the drop in popularity of Kevin Rudd to take over the position of Prime Minister of Australia. Did involve the miners in redesigning the law into the Minerals Resource Rent Tax (MRRT), eliminating its major shortcomings. However, the new law, which will become active in 2011, will drastically increase profits for the mining operations in Australia, forcing many mining firms to re-evaluate investments.

10. Jacques Nasser – Chairman of BHP Billiton

The man behind the scenes at BHP Billiton. Worked with Kloppers on all major events this year, including the super profits tax, the Pilbara JV, and the PotashCorp offer. Appointed former British Minister Shriti Vadera on the company’s board and prepared the decision to restart high dividend payments to shareholders.

11. Xiong Weiping – President Chinalco

12. Anil Agarwal – Executive Chairman Vedanta Resources

13. Partha Bhattacharyya – Chairman Coal India

14. Ivan Glasenberg – CEO Glencore

15. Mahmoud Thiam – Minister of Mines and Geology Guinea

16. Sukhbaatar Batbold – Prime Minister Mongolia

17. Brad Wall – Prime Minister Saskatchewan

18. Xi Jinping – Trade Minister China

19. Vladimir Kim – Chairman Kazakhmys

20. Duncan Sloan – Global Mining Lead Accenture

21. Mike Elliott – Global Mining & Metals Lead Ernst & Young

22. William MacNamara – Mining Analyst Financial Times

23. Robert Friedland – Founder Ivanhoe Mines

24. John Chadwick – Editor International Mining

25. Chen Yan – Governor China Development Bank

 

©2010 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Kazakhmys chairman offloads $1.3bn stake

October 11, 2010 Comments off

“Vladimir Kim, chairman of Kazakhmys, has sold an 11 per cent stake in the London-listed Kazakh copper miner for $1.3bn in a transaction that could pave the way for the company’s secondary listing in Hong Kong.

Mr Kim, who led the privatisation of Kazakhstan’s biggest copper-mining complex before floating it in 2005, sold 58.9m Kazakhmys shares to Samruk-Kazyna, the Kazakh national investment company.

The sale is a transfer that injects no further liquidity into Kazakhmys’s closely held shareholder base. However, Mr Kim revealed that he would “make available” up to 21.4m shares, representing 4 per cent of Kazakhmys equity, for a Hong Kong listing. Mr Kim still owned 28 per cent of Kazakhmys after the sale, Kazakhmys said in a statement. He remains the company’s chairman and largest single shareholder.”

Source: Financial Times, October 5 2010

Observations:

  • Kazakhmys, a $2.4bln revenue copper, zinc, silver, gold producer, and ENRC (Eurasian Natural Resources Company), a $3.8bln revenue iron ore, aluminium and energy producer, are Kazakhstan’s largest mineral producers. Both companies are listed on the London Stock Exchange, but are largely owned by early investors and the Kazakh government. Furthermore, Kazakhmys holds 22% of the shares of ENRC.
  • Kazakhmys is planning to list on the Hong Kong Exchange with an additional 4%, worth approx. $0.5bln, to be closer to the main consumer market of copper. Mr. Kim still owns 28% of the shares.

Implications:

  • Mr. Kim was born in 1961 and has collected a $3.7bln fortune by developing Kazakhmys into the main copper producer in the area. It is stated his divestment of part of the ownership of Kazakhmys should help him to diversify his investment portfolio, which might imply that he is interested in buying a significant stake of another resources company in the region for which he sees opportunities to grow.

©2010 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

%d bloggers like this: