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Posts Tagged ‘Minmetals’

Mining Weekly 52/’12: Copper Wars continued, South African taxes

December 24, 2012 Comments off

Top Stories:

  • Copper Wars: First Quantum raises takeover bid for Inmet
    • Almost 2 years after the consolidation in the copper mining industry was accelerated by the proposed merger of Lundin and Inmet, First Quantum is trying to take over Inmet to form a major copper producer. Inmet’s board rejected two earlier, lower bids, and is now facing a $5.1bn takover offer.
    • The proposed Lundin-Inmet (Symterra) merger did not materialize because Equinox made a takeover bid for Lundin, after which Equinox was acquired by Barrick, which ‘won’ a bidding war with Minmetals.
    • In attempts to get the Cobre Panama project funded Inmet earlier this year sold a stream with most of the planned precious metals production to royalty company Franco Nevada for an investment of approx. $1bn.
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; Financial Times; Newsday

    Copper Wars - Inmet - First Quantum

  • ANC will not nationalize South African mines, but wants to increase taxes
    • The ruling ANC party has turned down a plan to nationalize the mining sector in the country. At the same time the party leaders do call for increased taxes to keep a larger part of the benefits from natural resource extraction in the country. No details on the tax increases have been given yet.
    • Sources: The Globe and Mail; Wall Street Journal; Financial Times

Trends & Implications:

  • The copper industry is in a phase of consolidation because many large development projects are in the hands of relatively small miners who don’t have the funds to develop the large projects on their own. With project pipelines being scrutinized in the light of slowing demand growth, large miners are searching for and buying those projects that are actually going to make it, and small miners with and without good development projects try to team up to combine operating assets with strong development projects.
  • South Africa is already one of the countries with the highest effective tax rates to mining companies in the world, combining a 28% income tax rate with a 10% secondary tax, and adding mining royalties depending on the mineral mined. Further tax increases will make it very unlikely that foreign companies try to enter into the South African mining landscape, but will also make it more attractive for the large South African players to try to expand abroad.

2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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Minmetals in C$1.3bln bid for Canada’s Anvil

October 4, 2011 Comments off

“China’s Minmetals Resources has launched a C$1.3bn (US$1.25bn) takeover offer for Anvil Mining, a Toronto-listed copper producer, in a move that underscores the rising international profile of Chinese mining companies.
Chinese miners have been slowly but steadily advancing their overseas presence, as China’s consumption of key commodities such as copper, gold and coal continues to grow.

Minmetals announced Friday it would offer C$8 per share for Anvil in a friendly deal that has the approval of Anvil’s board and major shareholder, Trafigura Beheer. The price is a 30 per cent premium to Anvil’s 20-day trade-weighted average.”

Source: Financial Times, September 30 2011

Observations:

  • Minmetal’s made a bid for Equinox in April, but withdrew this offer after Barrick offered a higher price.
  • Minmetals acquired many assets of OZ minerals in Australia in 2009. Its mining division MMG is mainly managed by western managers and operates mines in Australia and Laos.
  • Anvil’s most important asset is the Kinsevere copper project in Congo, which is expanding to a 60,000tpa capacity and has proven and probable reserves of approx. 750 thousand tons contained copper.

Implications:

  • Anvil’s board informally put the company up for sale last month although it is in the process of a fully financed expansion program. Analysts expect the move to be driven by the large shareholders that want to cash in on their investment.
  • Minmetals will continue to look for $1-7bln copper investments in Southern Africa, trying to expand its portfolio and potentially build on the experience of Anvil’s management. According to the Economist stability in the Katanga copper region is uncertain as the strong governor of the province has decided to leave the office next year. Congo’s copper assets will certainly be in the center point of attention in the coming year.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Copper wars: Barrick outbids Minmetals for Equinox

April 26, 2011 Comments off

“Barrick Gold Corporation announced today that it has entered into a support agreement with Equinox Minerals Limited for Barrick to acquire, through an all-cash offer, all of the issued and outstanding common shares of Equinox (including the shares represented by Equinox’s CHESS Depositary Interests) by way of a friendly take-over offer. The Offer is for C$8.15 per Equinox share in cash, or a total of approximately C$7.3 billion. The Offer represents a 30% premium based on Equinox’s closing share price on the Toronto Stock Exchange on February 25, 2011 (the last trading day before Equinox announced its intention to make a take-over bid for the common shares of Lundin Mining Corporation). The Offer also represents a 16% premium over the per share price under the offer for Equinox proposed by Minmetals Resources Ltd. on April 3, 2011 (which offer has not yet commenced).”

Source: Barrick Press Release, April 26 2011

Observations:

  • Barrick’s appearance as a white knight is a surprising turn in the copper wars, which started in January when Inmet and Lundin announced plans to merge into Symterra
  • Minmetals dropped its bid for Equinox the day after Barrick’s offer, saying that entering into a bidding war would destruct value for its shareholders.

Implications:

The bid by Barrick has two interesting implications: a continued uncertainty about consolidation in the copper industry; and changing dynamics in the relationship between gold and copper miners.

  • Consolidation in the copper industry: although Minmetals appears not to enter into a bidding war, other offers for Equinox might follow. The incentive to keep Barrick out of the copper industry might trigger players like Freeport-McMoran and Xstrata/Glencore to make an offer. Furthermore the players that started the copper wars, Inmet and Lundin, are available as takeover or merger targets again.
  • Copper vs. Gold dynamics: Barrick’s entrance into the copper arena is a significant change of strategy for the gold miner. Its Chilean copper operations did not account for more than 10% of revenue until now, but the copper output will be doubled by adding Equinox’ capacity. Operational synergies with Equinox’ assets in Zambia and Saudi Arabia will not be achieved, thus the acquisition is purely a move for increased diversification. Other gold miners, sitting on piles of cash, might follow Barrick’s strategy.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Xstrata awaits Glencore overtures

April 14, 2011 Comments off

“Xstrata’s silence speaks volumes. The miner is just waiting for a proposal after Ivan Glasenberg, the head of Glencore, made clear that he is gunning for the London-listed multinational, in which the commodities trader owns a 34 per cent stake.

Breaking a decade-long silence, Mr Glasenberg says he sees value in combining Glencore with Xstrata. ‘Why has that not happened? It is a value debate. Xstrata … seems more comfortable for Glencore to go public and get a market price before they may or may not enter into discussions,’ he adds.

In February, Mick Davis, Xstrata chief executive, raised the prospect of a merger too, telling analysts that the prospect of an independently listed Xstrata and Glencore is ‘unsustainable in the long term’.”

Source: Financial Times, April 12 2011

Observations:

  • Glencore plans to float 20% of the company, worth some $12bln, in an IPO. Current management will retain majority shareholdership.
  • Glencore today announced the composition of its new board of directors, which will include former BP CEO Tony Hayward and former Xstrata CEO Peter Coates.

Implications:

  • The trend to stronger integration of mining firms and trading firms (the trader’s value chain), which is exemplified by the potential Glencore/Xstrata merger, can also be seen in Chinese Minmetals’ foray into mining by forming MMR earlier and planning to acquire Equinox this month.
  • Now that it appears Glencore will IPO prior to merging with Xstrata, its options to combine the two firms are to buy all other shares of the company, to try to get 50%+ of the shares to enable financial consolidation, or to pursue a real (share exchange) merger. With Xstrata’s current market value of $67bln (and Glencore holding 34% of the shares) gaining control will cost Glencore at least $12bln, with a full takeover costing over $45bln.
  • Glencore will be able to use the $12bln raised in the IPO, could leverage this by taking on more debt, and could issue additional shares in a later stage to raise more capital, but it will likely try to convince Xstrata shareholders to accept Glencore shares as a (partial) payment. In this way the combined company will retain significant firepower to do additional opportunistic acquisitions.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Copper wars: Minmetals in $6.5bn bid for Equinox

April 4, 2011 Comments off

“China’s Minmetals Resources has launched a C$6.3bn (US$6.5bn) unsolicited bid for Equinox Minerals, the Australian-Canadian copper miner which itself is in the throes of seeking to acquire Vancouver-based Lundin Mining. The bid is the largest-ever unsolicited takeover attempt by a Chinese mining company, at a time when China’s miners are increasingly seeking to go abroad.

Minmetals on Sunday night said its all-cash offer of C$7 per share, a 23 per cent premium to Friday’s closing price, was a superior alternative for Equinox shareholders to the Lundin acquisition, offering them ‘certainty of value and timing in realising their investments’.

The bid is conditional on Equinox dropping its offer for Lundin. Andrew Michelmore, Minmetals’ chief executive, said that the Chinese group was only interested in buying Equinox, which he said aligned with Minmetals’ strategy for growth and enhanced its global production portfolio.”

Source: Financial Times, April 4 2011

Observations:

  • Minmetals is the third stage in the developing copper wars for consolidation in the industry. In the first stage Lundin and Inmet proposed a merger of equals named Symterra. In the second stage this merger was derailed by a takeover attempt of Lundin by Equinox.
  • Minmetals is one of the most active Chinese companies in foreign investment, buying most of the assets of Australian OZ Minerals to form Minerals and Metals Group (MMG) in 2009 for $1.4bln. It appears Minerals and Metals Group and Equinox will be combined. MMG is mainly run by western managers.

Implications:

  • For most shareholders the all-cash offer of Minmetals will be preferable to the takeover of Lundin, which would increase the gearing of the company to dangerous levels. Equinox’ management might be able to get a slightly better price from Minmetals, but it is unlikely that the company will stay independent.
  • The announcement of Minmetals comes on the same day the World Copper Conference kicks off in Santiago. Many of the industry’s CEOs are gathered for this event. Also today, Chinalco announced its intention to expand the scope of activities from aluminium to other commodities, including copper. It is unlikely that other state-controlled Chinese companies will come with a competing offer for Equinox, but the meetings around the Copper Conference might trigger other M&A developments in the industry.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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