Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Rio Tinto’

M&A Share Attractiveness Ranking – February 2013

February 17, 2013 Comments off

The latest update of the M&A share attractiveness ranking for the world’s 40 largest mining companies demonstrates the current slump of gold (and to lesser extent copper) mining stocks. Discounting Ivanhoe, which has been taken out by Rio Tinto, ENRC tops the list of companies that might become the target of an acquisition. The company’s stock moved higher over the past weeks on acquisition rumors, reducing its attractiveness ranking, but analysts still see approximately 50% upside in the stock. Behind ENRC the ranking is dominated by gold and copper miners, with Anglo American the only non gold or copper miner in the top 10. Low gold and copper prices and the emergence of gold ETFs has depressed the share price of the miners over the past year, but most analysts still expect better times for this group of miners.

The thebusinessofmining.com M&A share attractiveness ranking is a combination of analyst expectations and current share level compared to the annual high, normalized against BHP’s share performance. The ranking provides a market perspective of how ‘cheap’ a stock is for potential acquirers.

Mining M&A - Share attractiveness chart - 130217

Mining M&A - Share attractiveness ranking - 130217

Mining Week 3’/13: New CEOs for Anglo American and Rio Tinto

January 19, 2013 Comments off

Top Stories:

  • Mark Cutifani is Anglo’s new CEO
    • Anglo announced the appointment of Mark Cutifani, CEO or AngloGold, as the new CEO, replacing Cynthia Carroll in April. The departure of Mrs. Carroll had been announced some time ago.
    • Mr. Cutifani has been heading AngloGold since 2007, working as COO of Inco before that. He is an Australian nation, but has extensive experience in South Africa, which should help Anglo to both manage the important government relations in South Africa and become less dependent on the country.
    • Sources: Anglo press release; Financial Times Videos; Wall Street Journal

  • Walsh replaces Albanese as CEO of Rio Tinto
    • Rio Tinto announced the sudden replacement of CEO Tom Albanese by Sam Walsh, who had been heading the company’s iron ore group since 2004. Albanese and Doug Ritchie, the head of the coal group, stepped down because of write-downs of $14bn on acquisitions, including $10-11bn on the acquisition of Alcan in 2008, and $3bn on recent coal acquisitions in Mozambique.
    • Sources: Rio Tinto press release; Reuters Videos; Wall Street Journal

Trends & Implications:

  • With the departure of Albanese as CEO of Rio Tinto, each of the top 5 diversified miners has a replacement of CEO in a timeframe of 2 years. Only BHP Billiton has not yet announced who the new CEO will be. The previous group of CEOs started their jobs during the high-growth period in which the size of their companies grew exponentially, and then had to lead the same companies through the global financial crisis and debt crisis. The new chief executives will have to manage the performance of their companies in a period of lower growth and potentially more stability in terms of asset base and outlook.

CEO_CFO Top5

2013 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Mining Week 47/’12: BHP sells diamonds; Anglo pays for iron ore

November 18, 2012 Comments off

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Harry Winston buys BHP’s diamond business for $500m
    • Diamond retailer Harry Winston has decided to buy BHP Billiton’s diamond business for $500m cash. The business consists of 80% of the EKATI diamond mine in Northern Canada and sorting and marketing units.
    • Both BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto put their diamond businesses up for sale this year. Rio Tinto might be reconsidering that decision as it couldn’t secure a good price for its Diavik mine and its Indian holdings have come back with good exploration results.
    • Sources: BHP Billiton press release; Harry Winston press release; Financial Times
  • Anglo’s Minas Rio iron ore project delayed and more expensive
    • Anglo American announced that Minas Rio, its 26.5Mtpa iron ore project in Brazil, will not start producing before the second half of 2014. The delay is caused by license issues around construction of power transmission lines.
    • Anglo also announced that the total capital cost for the project is “unlikely to be less that $8.0bn”, making this the first major iron ore project which costs more than $300 per millions tonnes capacity.
    • Sources: Anglo American press release; Reuters; mining.com
  • Qatar’s support appears to seal GlenStrata deal
    • The Qatar Sovereign wealth fund has announced it will support Glencore’s offer of 3.2 shares per share for Xstrata, making it very likely that the largest mining deal of the past years will become reality. Xstrata’s shareholders get to vote on Tuesday.
    • Qatar, Xstrata’s 2nd largest shareholder after Glencore, also announced it will abstain from voting on the retention incentive package for Xstrata top management, making it very likely that this >$200m retention package will not become reality.
    • Sources: Qatar holding; Financial Times 1; Financial Times 2

Trends & Implications:

  • Anglo’s issues in Brazil demonstrate the enormous importance of getting power issues for large projects sorted out early. Last month Rio Tinto’s enormous Oyu Tolgoi project in Mongolia was only hinging on a power supply agreement with the Mongolian and Chinese governments. Many projects in developing countries either need to secure power supply from other countries or have to build their own power plants, forcing them to go through tremendous licensing issues and import natural resources to get their operations powered up.
  • When the Xstrata retention package is voted down, a big group of top-level executives at Xstrata can be expected to start looking for new jobs quickly, opening up a great pool of talent for other companies. The corporate cultures at Xstrata and Glencore are so different that many miners will have to adjust to the more aggressive, top-down culture of the trading house. Many of the top managers will prefer to find a good job in another mining house instead.

2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Mining Week 46/’12: Lonmin vs. Xstrata & the CEO-carousel

November 10, 2012 Comments off

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Lonmin raises equity to stay independent
    • Lonmin announced a $800m rights offering, in that way fending of the proposal by Xstrata to increase its stake in the troubled platinum miner to a majority share.
    • The strikes in South Africa, which escalated at Lonmin’s operations, have caused significant lost production and urgent financial issues for Lonmin.
    • Sources: Lonmin press release; Financial Times; Wall Street Journal
  • BHP starts search for new CEO
    • BHP Billiton has started the search for the successor of CEO Marius Kloppers. Apparently the company will not necessarily promote an insider to the top position.
    • With Mick Davis leaving Xstrata if/when the merger with Glencore is approved and Cynthia Carroll leaving AngloAmerican next year, 3 of the top CEOs in the mining industry will change.
    • Sources: Financial Times 1; The Economist; Financial Times 2
  • India limits export of iron ore
    • Iron ore exports from the Indian state of Orissa will be limited strongly by new production quota for mines without processing facilities.
    • The government is trying to attract processing investment to prevent iron ore is only exported without significant benefit for the country. High export duties (raised to 30% early this year) and production quota are used to discourage exports from the world’s 3rd largest iron ore exporter.
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; Commodity Online; Steel Orbis

Trends & Implications:

  • Orissa’s attempts to curb exports don’t do much to stimulate local investment in processing capacity. India’s government announced a year ago that it would make it more attractive for companies to invest by setting up mining right and process plant permitting packages. With the current uncertainty about both global demand and India’s local demand outlook it is unlikely that large investments in additional processing capacity will be made in Orissa in the near future. As a result the will mainly slow down the local economy.
  • Almost a year ago, after the announcement of Ferreira as new CEO of Vale, this blog conducted a poll among its readers to find out which top company CEO was mostly to be replaced first. The results showed most trust in the future of Kloppers at BHP. A year later 3 out of 4 are on their way out, while most CFOs have been replaced over the past 2 years too. The high level of activity in replacing top executives indicates a change of mindset in the boards of these companies: shifting from a focus on growth and investment to a focus on operational excellence and payout. The new group of top executives will mainly need to show a track record of cost-control and willingness to make tough decisions on closure of mines.

Results of Dec-2011 Poll on thebusinessofmining.com

2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Mining Week 39/’12: Fortescue moves on; GlenStrata almost there

September 22, 2012 Comments off

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Xstrata’s board votes October 1st on Glencore offer
    • The decision by Xstrata’s board on whether or not to endorse Glencore’s new bid for the company is delayed by a week to October 1st. The endorsement might help to convince a majority of shareholders to accept the offer for 3.05 shares of Glencore per share of Xstrata.
    • The debate around generous retention packages for Xstrata’s key managers started again as several large shareholders voiced their discontent. Glencore stressed nothing will change to those packages unless Xstrata’s board wants to adjust them. Finding a compromise to satisfy the key shareholders might be the final step for the board to make the deal happen.
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; Financial Times 1; Financial Times 2
  • Fortescue solves debt problems by refinancing $4.5b debt
    • Fortescue announced refinancing of $4.5bn debt with Credit Suisse and JP Morgan as underwriters. Debt maturity of the new deal is 5 years. The company was facing liquidity problems as low iron ore prices and aggressive investment schedules were undermining its ability to repay debt.
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; Fortescue announcement

    Fortescue’s debt profile prior to refinancing

  • Oyu Tolgoi waiting for power
    • Rio Tinto’s Oyu Tolgoi mine is 97% complete, but negotiations with Mongolian and Chinese governments on power supply delay startup. Oyu Tolgoi built 220Kvolt power line to connect to the Chinese grid, but can’t sign a offtake agreement without consent of the Mongolian government
    • Sources: Financial Times; The Australian; Project website

Trends & Implications:

  • Oyu Tolgoi’s trouble to get powered is just one example of the challenges many large operations face to secure affordable power supply. The power requirements of a large operation require a significant change and development of power grids of many developing nations. Generation capacity is typically not readily available and the large offtake trigger discussions about long term price agreements.
  • After meeting with Glencore’s board this week, Xstrata’s board appears to be working hard to make the merger/acquisition go ahead. It is hard to imagine another outcome in which Xstrata’s shareholders get more value for their company, making it likely they will accept the offer. If the deal is approved by Xstrata’s shareholders, the changes in holdings various large investors will likely make will give an interesting insight into the clientele effect the integration of a mining house and a commodity trader could have.

2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Mining Week 38/’12: Fortescue in debt trouble; South African shutdowns

September 16, 2012 Comments off

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Fortescue trading halted in prep for announcement
    • Trading in Fortescue’s shares has been halted in preparation of an announcement to be made by Tuesday Sep-18. The company earlier in the week stressed it is in compliance with all its debt covenants, but it is looking to restructure debt as low prices and aggressive expansion investment could result in short-term liquidity problems for the company.
    • Fortescue is a rapidly growing iron ore producer active in Western Australia’s Pilbara region. The company is ramping up to produce 155mn tonnes per year (from a current 60Mtpa), but it has lost 50% of its market value over the past 6 months as investors doubt it will manage to finance the investment plans without sustained high iron ore prices.
    • Sources: Fortescue announcements; Financial Times; The Australian
  • South African trouble spreads beyond Lonmin
    • Anglo Platinum shut down its Rustenburg operations this week as employees showing up for work were intimidated by striking colleagues. In the meantime Lonmin’s Marikana operations are still shut down and Xstrata and GoldFields reduced production in precautionary measures.
    • Despite talks between Lonmin and unions a deal between the striking miners and the company appears to be a long way off. The gap between Lonmin’s wage increase offer and the demands by the unions is over 100%, and the social unrest and promises made by many leaders make it hard for the unions to accept a deal that is much lower than the initial demands.
    • Sources: Financial Times 1; Wall Street Journal; Financial Times 2
  • Glencore’s new offer received positively
    • Glencore released the details of its new offer for takeover of Xstrata. The increased share ration and deal terms appear to win over a sufficient part of Xstrata’s shareholders to make the deal happen. Qatar’s sovereign wealth fund, Xstrata’s 2nd largest shareholders behind Glencore, did not yet respond to the offer.
    • According to the new terms Xstrata’s CEO Mick Davis would have to step down and leave the reign to Glencore’s Ivan Glasenberg within 6 months and the retention package for senior Xstrata managers would stay intact unless Xstrata’s board of directors wants to change it.
    • Sources: Glencore documentation; text; Financial Times

Trends & Implications:

  • Fortescue might suddenly become the focal point of the next big takeover attempt in the mining industry. Share price has decreased dramatically compared to iron ore majors, and both BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto could realize significant synergies with Fortescue’s operations and projects in Western Australia’s Pilbara region.
  • The current low iron ore price has created a situation in which Fortescue’s share price is depressed because operating cash flow does not support the planned combination of investment and debt repayment. Fortescue’s expansion is for a large part finance by debt, loading a company which is worth just over $9bn with over $8bn of debt. BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto, and Vale should all be interested in an acquisition and would be able to get a better deal at debt restructuring because they would pose a lower risk of default to lenders.
  • Caused in part by less potential for economies of scale in transportation than the key competitors, Fortescue operates at clearly higher costs (i.e. lower margins) than Rio and BHP. Quickly realizing cost synergies and aligning the project portfolio with the larger portfolio for the acquiring company would/will be the focus of successful integration.

2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

Mining Week 33/’12: Coal, copper, iron ore profit drops

August 13, 2012 Comments off

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Harry Winston chooses between BHP’s and Rio’s diamond business
    • Harry Winston, the diamond retailer that holds a 40% stake in Rio Tinto’s Diavik mine in Northern Canada, is in talks with BHP Billiton to buy the Ekati operation, also in the north of Canada. Both Rio Tinto and BHP are trying to get out of the diamond business as they can’t realize the scale in the industry to make it a core business.
    • Titan, part of the Tata group, is rumoured to be interested in an acquisition of Harry Winston and might emerge as a competitor in the consolidation movement in the diamond business with strong financial backing.
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; Financial Times
  • Xstrata’s profit drops on prices and volumes
    • Xstrata’s operating profit for the first half year dropped by 42%. Approx. half of the drop is attributed to lower commodity prices, the other half mainly to inflation and lower volumes.
    • An important message communicated in Xstrata’s earnings presentation is the potential of the company to continue stand-alone in case the share acquisition by Glencore (supported by Xstrata management) fails. Xstrata’s shareholders get to vote on the deal on September 7th.
    • Sources: Financial Times 1; Financial Times 1; Xstrata presentation
  • Rio Tinto profits down on lower coal and iron ore prices

Trends & Implications:

  • Xstrata is among the few companies that manages to communicate (or achieve) a unit cost reduction in its earnings presentation, probably the largest driver of positive reception of the quarterly numbers by the investment community. By breaking out the ‘uncontrollable’ inflation part the company communicates it has success in cost cutting, even though nominal costs increased year on year.
  • Most large miners are stressing the discipline of their capital investments in the latest presentations they are giving, promising only to invest if a good return can be achieved. The most prominent example of a potential cutback on capital expenditure is BHP’s announcement that it is reviewing the expansion of the outer harbour in Western Australia required to lift iron ore export capacity to the planned level. While trying hard to show the investments are responsible, the companies also try to communicate that ‘the industry fundamentals’ are still solid, mainly using the projected long-term growth of China as explanation. However, Rio Tinto’s updated demand forecast graphs are among the first that show a negative Chinese trend after 2030 (in line with the model presented on this site). Knowing that a large part of current big projects in iron ore and coal are planned to build capacity for more than 20 years these long-term prospects slowly start to make their way into investment decision-making.

©2012 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

%d bloggers like this: