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Posts Tagged ‘Yanzhou’

Mining Week 52/’11: Chinese investment welcome in Australia

December 31, 2011 1 comment

Top Stories of the Week:

  • Australia solicits Chinese infrastructure investment
    • The government of Western Australia is trying to speed up the development of port and rail facilities of the Mid West region’s Oakajee port by stripping the Mitsubishi/Murchison combination of exclusive development rights and inviting Chinese parties to step in. 8 of the 14 projects in development in the region have Chinese investors.
    • Sources: Wall Street Journal; Government statement; Murchison Metals statement
  • Yanzhou teams up with Gloucester coal
  • Anglo and Codelco fight for Minas Sur stake
    • Anglo American launched a range of claims in Chilean court trying to prevent Codelco from being awarded the right to buy a full 49% of the Minas Sur assets. The scope of the option for Codelco to buy 49% has been unclear since Anglo sold a 24.5% stake to Mitsubishi. In response to Anglo’s claims Codelco restated its intention to acquire 49% of the full project.
    • Sources: Financial Times 1; Financial Times 2; Anglo American press release

Trends & Implications:

  • As expected Chinese investments have proven to be a key driver of M&A activity in the mining industry in 2011. It is noteworthy that many Chinese firms are using a foreign based subsidiary or team up with a Western firm to do foreign investments. This structure holds 2 main benefits for the Chinese investors: they obtain an experienced western staff with knowledge of the way of doing business in the target countries; and they are viewed much more favorably by regulators when trying to execute deals.
  • The fight of Anglo American and Codelco over Minas Sur appears to become a long term court fight. The longer this court fight stretches, the more inclined Anglo American will be to find a compromising deal, as the uncertainty about the ownership structure will delay all investment decisions for the company in the mining region.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com

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Korean Consortium Leads in Whitehaven Coal Takeover

February 17, 2011 Comments off

“In the latest scramble for Australia’s resources by Asian consumers worried about energy security, a Korean consortium has made an initial offer to buy Whitehaven Coal Ltd., a company valued at 3.5 billion Australian dollars (US$3.5 billion).

The non-binding offer by Korea Resources Corp., known as Kores, and Daewoo International Corp. underscores how volatility in commodity markets is driving consumers to bid more aggressively for high-quality reserves that can be shipped home. Coal prices recently surged to two-year highs after major mines around the world were hit by heavy flooding.

Whitehaven, which produces coking coal used in steelmaking and thermal coal used in power generation from five mines in New South Wales state, put itself up for sale last year in a move to capitalize on this wave of acquisition activity. Updating the market Feb. 7, Sydney-based Whitehaven said short-listed parties have been invited to complete more detailed due diligence and submit binding offers. It didn’t identify potential buyers, but the market expects companies from China, the U.S. and India to be involved.”

Source: Wall Street Journal, February 15 2011

Observations:

  • Whitehaven started an official takeover procedure, in which a list of potential bidders is invited to bid for the company based on information provided by the seller in a data room, last year. Initial offers were due of February 2nd, with binding offers expected over the coming month.
  • Driven by increasing coal prices, various Asian companies have bought Australian coal assets to secure access to raw materials over the past 18 months. China’s Yanzhou Coal Mining, Thailand’s Banpu Energy, and India’s Adani secured deals. China Shenhua (which owns assets near Whitehaven’s mines) and Indian ICVL are named as potential competing bidders for Whitehaven.

Implications:

  • The Korean Consortium will likely not be the only bidder in the takeover process. Typically multiple bidders are led to submit an offer in a takeover procedure in order to maximize the price paid for the company. Potential bidders without operating assets in Australia are not expected to be able to realize high synergies, making the bidder that is prepared to take most risk or that is most optimistic about the value ‘win’ the battle.
  • The buyer of Whitehaven might face regulatory obstacles from Australia’s Foreign Investment Review Board, which forced Yanzhou Coal Mining Co. to list the Australian assets in Australia to keep control over the domestic energy industry.

©2011 | Wilfred Visser | thebusinessofmining.com